Top Shot: The Morning Dream Top Shot features the photo…

Top Shot: The Morning Dream

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

“Here is a morning view with foggy valleys near Bucegi Mountains, Romania and a dark stormy cloud which luckily missed me. I love spring landscapes because the nature is so green and the higher mountains over 2000 meters are still snow-capped,” writes Your Shot photographer Adrian Petrisor. “Some people think I’m crazy because I wake up at 4 o’clock in a weekend morning to climb mountains only to see the sunrise…But when the nature is so kind to me and brings such incredible views like this, I totally consider it worth all the effort.” Photograph by Adrian Petrisor

Top Shot: The Morning Dream

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

“Here is a morning view with foggy valleys near Bucegi Mountains, Romania and a dark stormy cloud which luckily missed me. I love spring landscapes because the nature is so green and the higher mountains over 2000 meters are still snow-capped,” writes Your Shot photographer Adrian Petrisor. “Some people think I’m crazy because I wake up at 4 o’clock in a weekend morning to climb mountains only to see the sunrise…But when the nature is so kind to me and brings such incredible views like this, I totally consider it worth all the effort.” Photograph by Adrian Petrisor

4 hours agoJune 5, 2019Permalink

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‘Top Secret’ Maps Reveal The Massive Allied Effort Behind D-Day

The Allied invasion of German-occupied France that began in the early hours of June 6, 1944, was long in the making. By gaining supremacy in the Atlantic in 1943, the Allies had cleared the way for a huge buildup of American troops and equipment in Great Britain. Between January and June 1944, nine million tons of supplies and 800,000 soldiers crossed the Atlantic from the United States to bolster the invasion, designated Operation Overlord.

Meanwhile, Allied pilots exploited their hard-won superiority over the diminished German Luftwaffe by blasting French railways and bridges to keep their foes from rushing reserves to Normandy when troops landed there. Anglo-American commanders battle tested in North Africa and Italy, including American Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bernard Montgomery of the United Kingdom, prepared to lead invasion troops against their old foe, German general Erwin Rommel, assigned to strengthen French coastal defenses while the bulk of the German Army struggled to hold back resurgent Soviets on the Eastern Front. (See also: Memories of D-Day come alive on the beaches where it happened.)

The German wall

Planning for Operation Overlord began in London more than a year before the invasion took place. Allied staff officers led by Lt. Gen. Frederick Morgan debated where to pierce the Atlantic Wall, German coastal fortifications extending from Norway to the southwest coast of France. The shortest route to Germany lay across the Strait of Dover (Pas-de-Calais), but landing around Calais meant attacking the strongest sector of the Atlantic Wall.

Morgan and staff decided instead to land on the coast of Normandy, which lay farther from Germany but was less heavily fortified. Their original plan, drawn up in strict secrecy, called for three divisions to come ashore on a narrow front on D-Day. But when Eisenhower and Montgomery arrived in London in early 1944 to serve respectively as supreme commander and field commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force destined for Normandy, they altered the invasion plan based on amphibious operations in Italy. (See also: Excerpt: Rare World War II maps reveal Japan’s Pearl Harbor strategy.)




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Piercing the Wall

The German defensive barrier known as the Atlantic Wall included two areas that met the requirements for a massive Allied invasion—beaches that were accessible to landing craft, tanks, and other vehicles and were not too far from British ports or from Germany, the ultimate objective. Suitable beaches around Calais were only 30 miles from the port of Dover and 200 miles from the German border, but their proximity to the Reich meant that they were well defended. The other promising landing site—between the fortified ports of Le Havre and Cherbourg in Normandy—was farther from Germany but was chosen because beaches there were less heavily defended.

Five divisions would land on D-Day on a broader front, supported by three airborne divisions and followed by an immense influx of men and material. The huge commitment of landing craft and other resources to Normandy meant that a second invasion of France along the Mediterranean coast, which was meant to coincide with Overlord to prevent Germans in the south from being shifted to Normandy, would instead take place a few months after Overlord unfolded.

Germany’s defense

German commanders did not ignore the potential threat to Normandy. Rommel—in charge of Army Group B under Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt, German commander in chief in the West—laced beaches there with mines as well as obstructions that would force landing craft to disgorge troops at low tide, leaving them more exposed to enemy fire. Rommel wanted panzer divisions deployed at likely landing sites in Normandy to repulse invaders before they established a beachhead and were reinforced. “Everything we have must be on the coast,” he insisted.

Rundstedt disagreed, and Hitler decided to hold most German armored forces in reserve under his own control until the invasion took place. Only one panzer division guarded the Normandy coast beforehand. An elaborate Allied deception campaign called Operation Bodyguard—which included simulating phantom divisions and feeding false reports to Berlin from German agents under British control—led Hitler to view landings at Normandy as a diversion, which would be followed by a massive Allied thrust across the Strait of Dover. (See also: The inside story of how three unlikely allies won World War II.)

Dawning of D-Day

The invasion of Normandy was preceded by daring coastal and aerial reconnaissance that yielded detailed charts of the five landing zones: Gold, Juno, Sword, Utah, and Omaha beaches.

Omaha Beach, the largest of the of the D-Day attack zones, was subdivided into areas which were code-named Charlie, Dog (divided into Green, White, and Red sections), Easy (divided into Green and Red sections), and Fox (divided into Green and Red sections).




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Ensign Joseph Vaghi, a beachmaster at Omaha Beach, carried this top secret map to show where troops and equipment would deploy along the coast.

Foul weather forced Eisenhower to postpone Overlord until June 6. Two more weeks would pass before the moon and tides were again favorable for paratroopers landing inland before dawn and soldiers landing on the beaches at daybreak.

The decision to proceed on the sixth, during a predicted lull in the storm, caught German commanders by surprise. But some Allied landing craft and amphibious tanks sank in swells, and men who stayed afloat were seasick. Nausea mingled with dread as they disembarked under fire. “Many were hit in the water and drowned,” recalled Sgt. Bob Slaughter of the U.S. 29th Infantry Regiment. “There were dead men in the water and live men acting dead, letting the tide take them in.”




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War photographer Robert Capa accompanied the first wave of troops as they faced enemy fire and captured some of the most searing images of D-Day.

Nearly 3,000 Americans were killed or wounded on Omaha Beach, most of them in the first few hours. As shellfire from Allied warships began silencing enemy gunners on the cliffs, however, soldiers rallied and pushed inland through ravines toward Colleville-sur-Mer. Americans who landed at Utah Beach faced little resistance, and British and Canadian troops advanced several miles inland from their beaches and withstood a late-day counterattack by the 21st Panzer Division.

When Rommel returned that night to Normandy—after celebrating his wife’s birthday during the storm he thought would preclude an invasion—his worst fears were realized. He had warned a fellow officer that their only chance was to stop the enemy in the water. Now nearly 160,000 Allied troops had landed.

Expanding the beachhead

Following D-Day, the Allies had to transport troops and supplies to Normandy in vast amounts without access to a deepwater port. Germans assumed that their foes would require such a port, which lent credence to Allied deceptions portraying the Normandy landings as a diversion, to be followed by a big push aimed at a deeper port like Calais.

While the German 15th Army remained in place around Calais to defend against that anticipated thrust, the Allies reinforced their Normandy beachhead by constructing artificial harbors called mulberries, using components prefabricated in British ports and towed across the English Channel.

Mulberry A, completed off Omaha Beach in mid-June and linked to shore by a pontoon bridge, was wrecked a few days later by one of the worst storms to hit the coast that season. Mulberry B, constructed off Gold Beach near Arromanches, withstood that storm and helped boost Allied strength in Normandy to one million men by early July.




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Supply Line

Landing craft disgorge tanks and trucks at Omaha Beach on June 8, 1944, under barrage balloons whose mooring cables deterred enemy aircraft.

Reinforcements for the troops who landed on D-Day were essential because expanding the beachhead proved even tougher than establishing it on June 6. Inland from the beaches lay the forbidding bocage, consisting of low fields surrounded by dense hedgerows that sheltered German snipers, machine gunners, and anti-tank units. Not until June 27 did American troops seize the deepwater port of Cherbourg, which German demolition teams rendered useless until later that year.

Another important objective, heavily defended Caen, was not taken on D-Day, as Montgomery planned, and held out against repeated attacks. On June 13, the British Seventh Armored Division tried to outflank Caen but was repulsed at Villers-Bocage by elements of the First and Second SS Panzer Divisions.

Allied bombers blasted Caen on July 6, killing many French civilians but few Germans, who withdrew south of the city and resisted tenaciously as Montgomery tried to punch through their defenses. Although held in check, his forces kept several German armored divisions tied down while American troops prepared to launch Operation Cobra from Saint-Lô, west of Caen, and break out of the beachhead.

Beginning of the end

Although the landings on D-Day were less costly than Allied leaders feared, American forces destined for Omaha Beach paid a dreadful price before securing that sector. Casualties mounted as invasion forces advanced inland and met with fierce resistance. Not until late July did they break out, aided by devastating air raids that gouged holes in enemy lines through which armor advanced, including tanks of Patton’s U.S. Third Army. On August 15, a second Allied invasion designated Operation Dragoon unfolded on the French Mediterranean coast. Resistance groups took up arms, and some began liberating Paris before Allied troops entered the city in late August.

Watch This Veteran Fly in the Same WWII Plane He Jumped from on D-Day

The offensive in France and the Low Countries coincided with a massive onslaught by the Red Army, whose troops advanced into German-occupied Poland before invading Germany proper by entering East Prussia. Hitler refused to concede defeat and launched a desperate counterattack at year’s end against the Western Allies, whose advance had stalled as they ran short of supplies and came up against the formidable West Wall (Siegfried Line) along the German border.

The resulting Battle of the Bulge, won in January 1945, delayed their advance across the Rhine until March while vengeful Soviets closed on Berlin. “We may be destroyed,” Hitler had remarked earlier, “but if we are, we shall drag a world with us—a world in flames.” On April 30, with Berlin in flames and about to fall to the Russians, he committed suicide. A week later, Germany surrendered unconditionally.

Neil Kagan and Stephen G. Hyslop have partnered on many history books, including Eyewitness to the Civil War, Atlas of the Civil War, Eyewitness to World War II, and The Secret History of World War II.

Shark attacks: After recent bites, your questions answered

Shark attacks have been rising steadily for more than a century.

“The number of worldwide unprovoked shark attacks has grown at a steady pace since 1900, with each decade having more attacks than the previous,” reports the International Shark Attack File at the Florida Museum of Natural History.

The most recent attack occurred this weekend in North Carolina, during the month that marks the 44th anniversary of the movie Jaws.

Still, local officials say North Carolina’s beaches remain safe to visit, since the incidents are statistically very rare. An ocean swimmer has only a one in 11.5 million chance of being bitten by a shark, according to the museum.

In recent years, the state’s beach officials have said any shark “acting aggressive,” such as swimming within 100 feet of the shore, could be euthanized. That order prompted criticism from shark experts, who said the shark or sharks involved in attacks would likely not be in the area long.

Here are some more things you should know about sharks and shark attacks:

What kinds of sharks attack humans?

George Burgess, who studies shark attacks at the Florida Museum of Natural History, says coastal incidents are often caused by tiger or bull sharks. Those two species are often found right along the coast and are known to occasionally bite people.

Great white sharks, immortalized by Jaws, are also occasionally responsible for attacks on people. Other sharks involved in incidents around the world in recent years occasionally include mako, nurse, lemon, and spinner sharks.

Why do sharks attack people?

Burgess writes on his website in clear terms that “humans are not on the menu of sharks. Sharks bite humans out of curiosity or to defend themselves.”

As a result, the majority of incidents over time have tended to be what’s called “provoked” attacks, in which someone is bitten while spearfishing or while trying to catch a shark or release it from a line or net. Among unprovoked attacks, the fish are most often confusing people with their normal prey, often due to poor visibility. Surfers are most often involved, most likely because they spend long periods of time in the water and often splash around like prey.

Why are shark attacks rising?

Although individual years have so few shark attacks that statistical analysis in the short term is dicey, the long-term trend shows an increase in incidents. Part of that is likely due to better reporting, according to the Florida Museum of Natural History.

Shark Attack: Survival Guide

But beyond that, the most likely explanation for rising numbers of attacks is the “ever-increasing amount of time spent in the sea by humans, which increases the opportunities for interaction between the two affected parties,” according to the museum. A steadily rising human population is also a big factor.

So far in 2019, there have been 36 total shark attacks around the world, according to the Global Shark Attack File.

What should I do if a shark starts attacking me?

Hit it in the nose, which is often enough to end the attack, says the museum. Then head for shore.

If that doesn’t work, claw at its eyes and gill openings, two sensitive areas. “One should not act passively if under attack,” the museum says, because “sharks respect size and power.”

How do I reduce the odds of an attack?

People should remember that swimming in the ocean is always “a wildlife experience,” says Burgess. There are some ways to better your already very low odds of getting attacked. For one thing, it’s a good idea to avoid known shark nursery grounds, as tourists recently discovered in Recife, Brazil.

Shark safety researcher Christopher Neff suggests avoiding swimming during or after storms, which can make the water cloudy and churn up the bait fish that lead to shark feeding frenzies. Neff also suggests avoiding swimming at dawn and dusk, for the same reasons, as well as swimming near the presence of seals or other prey species or where fishermen have dumped guts.

It’s also a bad idea to feed sharks, which can confuse them or teach them to associate people with food.

Are there other shark safety tips?

Sharks can be attracted to blood, so people should avoid swimming with open wounds. Shiny objects can also attract sharks, who are naturally curious.

Neff suggests avoiding swimming alone or going too far away from shore. He also says people should avoid splashing around too much.

“There are a number of stories about the way playing ‘shark attack’ in the water attracted a shark to the area,” he says.

Do anti-shark wetsuits or repellents work?

A number of companies have marketed wetsuits and surfboards designed with patterns said to repel sharks, from killer whales to lionfish. The jury is still out on whether such products actually make a difference.

“I seriously doubt that will work,” shark ecologist Bradley M. Wetherbee of the University of Rhode Island told National Geographic.

Other research has investigated the efficacy of chemical and even electrical repellents, though more work needs to be done.

Is euthanizing sharks off beaches effective?

No, says Burgess. Sharks are highly migratory fish that can swim thousands of miles in a season, so targeting them in one place doesn’t make sense. Recent attempts to cull great white sharks to reduce attacks on people in Western Australia have met with sharp criticism from scientists.

Shark culls performed in Hawaii in the 1950s showed “no measurable effect on the rate of shark attacks on people,” said Chris Lowe, professor of marine biology at California State University, Long Beach, who analyzed the data taken during those culls.

Does the economy affect shark attacks?

Yes. The more tourists flock to beaches, the more shark attacks tend to occur, since people and fish have more chances to meet. In 2011, a recession year marked by lower tourism, the U.S. saw only 29 unprovoked shark attacks, compared to an average of 39 attacks for the previous decade.

Aren’t more sharks killed by humans than the other way around?

Yes, by a huge multiple. Experts estimate that around 100 million sharks are killed by people every year, in a haul that many consider unsustainable and which threatens many species. Sharks reproduce slowly so they are particularly vulnerable to overfishing.

Sharks are harvested for their fins, considered a delicacy in some Asian countries, and are collected for their meat and skins. They are also frequently ensnared in fishing gear as unwanted “bycatch.”

If many sharks are in trouble, how could attacks increase?

A rising number of countries, from the U.S. to the South Pacific, are passing and enforcing bans on shark fishing, and the fish are showing some localized signs of recovery as a result. However, the overall conservation picture remains dim, especially with illegal fishing.

Correction: A previous version of this story stated Jaws came out 30 years ago; it was 40 years ago (from 2015).

This story was originally published on June 15, 2015 and updated on June 4, 2019.

Top Shot: Light as a Feather Top Shot features the photo…

Top Shot: Light as a Feather

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Ron Holmes documented this female Rufous Hummingbird while in flight in Hoogdal, Washington. He writes, “I enjoy being able to study her beauty better when she holds still like this.” Photograph by Ron Holmes

Top Shot: Light as a Feather

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Ron Holmes documented this female Rufous Hummingbird while in flight in Hoogdal, Washington. He writes, “I enjoy being able to study her beauty better when she holds still like this.” Photograph by Ron Holmes

1 day agoJune 4, 2019Permalink

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Un’intervista con gravi conseguenze per Jovanotti

Nel 1994 usciva l’album Lorenzo 1994: Lorenzo Cherubini ripercorre con noi la storia del suo disco più iconico, tra una serenata rap e un primo bacio spaziale, in attesa del Jova Beach Tour che porterà sulle spiagge italiane nell’estate 2019

«Il disco andava fortissimo in America Latina, mi portarono a Miami a fare promozione, a cantare Penso positivo a Sábado gigante, che era il Fantastico dei Paesi latini. In studio a far da pubblico c’erano i latini di Miami: esuli cubani. A “Che Guevara”, si gelarono: sotto quella frase non c’è musica, fece l’effetto di un comizio, m’arrivò un’onda di sgomento. Fermarono la registrazione, successe un casino, ho rimosso i dettagli ma mi ricordo che non andò in onda l’ospitata». C’è stato un tempo in cui il tizio che sta davanti a me in un ristorante di Milano – Jovanotti – non era poi molto diverso da oggi, in pigiama di Zegna e cappellino degli Yankees, ma non aveva ancora creato il tormentone dei dibattiti politici dei decenni a venire.

Si dia dunque spazio a Penso positivo. La canzone accusata dai dubbiosi di sinistra di sintetizzare il difetto della loro parte politica: voler fare il minestrone che tenga dentro Che Guevara e madre Teresa. L’autore la vede da un’altra angolazione: «Io il dubbio non ce l’avevo su Che Guevara e madre Teresa: ce l’avevo su San Patrignano. M’è uscita ’sta rima, e non son riuscito a sostituirla, ma io non c’ero mai stato a San Patrignano, l’avevo sentito nominare. Ci stava con la metrica, e l’ho lasciata, perché per me le rime hanno a che fare con la magia, o con la fisica, con la struttura degli atomi; ma per me era quella la parola controversa. Quando uscì l’album aprimmo a mezzanotte il Virgin Megastore in piazza Duomo, c’era una marea di gente, ero lì a salutarli e mi passò davanti Frankie Hi-Nrg, che avevo forse incontrato una volta, e s’era fatto tutta la fila per dirmi se ero pazzo ad aver scritto quella rima. L’ho apprezzato. Gli dissi: ma io non sto parlando di bene o male, sto parlando di intenzioni. Non mi metto dalla parte di qualcuno: mi metto dalla parte mia, dichiaro che questa marmellata che io ho dentro è l’epoca in cui stiamo passando. Non faccio canzoni per dire come deve andare il mondo: faccio canzoni per dire come va secondo me. E quindi alla fine San Patrignano, di tutte, è l’immagine che mi rappresenta di più: qualcuno che pensa di fare il bene ma poi ogni tanto fa una cazzata».

Quando iniziò la festa vera?
«Il mio ingresso nella vita sociale risale all’estate del 1982. Quella del Mondiale vinto dall’Italia. L’estate più importante di sempre, quella in cui scoprii la musica. Iniziai a mettere dischi in radio e poi in una discoteca di Cortona. La mia prima paga da dj, 5.000 lire, me la ricordo ancora».

Perché fu l’estate più importante di sempre?
«Perché coincise con l’esatto momento in cui capii cosa volessi fare nella vita. Senza neanche l’ombra di un dubbio. Fu un istante di illuminazione totale, quasi mistica».

Il primo mentore?
«Mio fratello Umberto – lo ringrazierò per sempre – aveva un amico che faceva un programma di dediche a Radio Foxes. Mi portò con lui, entrai in questo studiolo, con le scatole di uova alle pareti per insonorizzare la stanza in maniera rudimentale e pensai: “Cazzo, ma questo è il posto più bello del mondo”. Avevo paura di essere arrivato sul ciglio del paradiso e di esserne subito cacciato. Chiesi timido: “Posso tornare?».

Li ha affrontati senza pregiudizi?
«Io ascoltavo Rino Gaetano, Edoardo Bennato o Lucio Dalla senza mai presumere che avessero più autorevolezza di Alberto Camerini o dei Righeira».

E il problema economico? Come lo superava?
«L’altro giorno pensavo che in fondo, un vero e proprio stipendio io non l’ho mai avuto. Da dj sono stato pagato a concerto o a serata e oggi a pensarci bene è ancora così. I soldi, lavorando, si trovavano».

Che lavori ha fatto?
«Il cameriere alle sagre, e lì si prendevan le mance che era un piacere e il barista nel bar di mio zio. Poi lo sverniciatore». (…)

Top Shot: In the Oil Lamp Light Top Shot features the photo…

Top Shot: In the Oil Lamp Light

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Tuấn Nguyễn photographed this woman as she knitted fishing nets by the light of an oil lamp in Hue, Vietnam. He writes, “Sea fishing is a long-standing traditional occupation in Vietnam. Men are seafarers, and women will sew fish nets or fix old ragged nets.” Photograph by Tuấn Nguyễn

Top Shot: In the Oil Lamp Light

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Tuấn Nguyễn photographed this woman as she knitted fishing nets by the light of an oil lamp in Hue, Vietnam. He writes, “Sea fishing is a long-standing traditional occupation in Vietnam. Men are seafarers, and women will sew fish nets or fix old ragged nets.” Photograph by Tuấn Nguyễn

5 days agoMay 31, 2019Permalink

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Top Shot: Little Kits on the Prairie Top Shot features the…

Top Shot: Little Kits on the Prairie

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Ly Dang documented these playful red fox kits chasing each other on the prairie at sunset. Photograph by Ly Dang

Top Shot: Little Kits on the Prairie

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Ly Dang documented these playful red fox kits chasing each other on the prairie at sunset. Photograph by Ly Dang

6 days agoMay 30, 2019Permalink

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215 notes

Top Shot: Come to Mama Top Shot features the photo with the…

Top Shot: Come to Mama

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Tracy Kerestesh documented this sweet moment as a bison calf appears to kiss its mother’s forehead. Photograph by Tracy Kerestesh

Top Shot: Come to Mama

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Tracy Kerestesh documented this sweet moment as a bison calf appears to kiss its mother’s forehead. Photograph by Tracy Kerestesh

1 week agoMay 29, 2019Permalink

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185 notes

Top Shot: Ellison’s Cave Top Shot features the photo with…

Top Shot: Ellison’s Cave

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

“Deep underground in Ellison’s Cave is a 488-foot pitch dropping into the famous TAG Hall of Pigeon Mountain, Georgia,” writes Your Shot photographer Ethan Reuter. “After traversing, climbing and crawling through small passage with heavy rope and gear, we found ourselves in an 18-inch stream crawl that jets out over a seemingly bottomless chasm. Unable to rappel out of this crawl, bolts were placed across the loose edge, where this photograph was captured with an old-style Sylvania No. 3 flashbulb.” Photograph by Ethan Reuter

Top Shot: Ellison’s Cave

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

“Deep underground in Ellison’s Cave is a 488-foot pitch dropping into the famous TAG Hall of Pigeon Mountain, Georgia,” writes Your Shot photographer Ethan Reuter. “After traversing, climbing and crawling through small passage with heavy rope and gear, we found ourselves in an 18-inch stream crawl that jets out over a seemingly bottomless chasm. Unable to rappel out of this crawl, bolts were placed across the loose edge, where this photograph was captured with an old-style Sylvania No. 3 flashbulb.” Photograph by Ethan Reuter

1 week agoMay 28, 2019Permalink

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280 notes

Top Shot: Underwater Light Show Top Shot features the photo…

Top Shot: Underwater Light Show

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

“Gobstopping light in the tunnel at Los Islotes as the sun reaches its zenith, rays getting cut by the rock and creating a magical scene from below,” writes Your Shot photographer Henley Spiers. “With the light so heartbreakingly beautiful, I just needed some subjects to add to the scene, and a couple of playful sea lion pups kindly obliged.” Photograph by Henley Spiers

Top Shot: Underwater Light Show

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

“Gobstopping light in the tunnel at Los Islotes as the sun reaches its zenith, rays getting cut by the rock and creating a magical scene from below,” writes Your Shot photographer Henley Spiers. “With the light so heartbreakingly beautiful, I just needed some subjects to add to the scene, and a couple of playful sea lion pups kindly obliged.” Photograph by Henley Spiers

1 week agoMay 28, 2019Permalink

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249 notes